1/1

The Bayles  family, of Port Jefferson (NY) was involved in caulking, and the building of barks, brigs, schooners, ships (whalers), steamers, sloops, yacht (schooners), and yacht (sloops) under five (5) names: (1.) Elisha Bayles, (2.) James M. & C. L. Bayles, (3.) James M. Bayles, (4.) James M. Bayles & Son, and (5.) C. L. Bayles.
First, Elisha Bayles was a ship caulker, and according to the New Bedford (MA) Museum, “ship c...

In an industry dominated by men for a variety of very valid reasons – the time demands, the need for physical strength, the isolation – when a woman becomes captain of a ship, it seems as if this  must be a first, but women have been ship captains going back to the 18th century. Captain Philomene Daniels, who ran steamboats with her husband as Daniels Boat Line, was the first woman in the United States to be licensed as a pilo...

June 27, 2017

Donning scuba gear, you don’t have to descend very far below the surface of Long Island Sound to discover some of its prettiest marine animals.  In less than 20 feet, you can encounter large flower-like clusters of pink-hearted hydroids, swaying slowly back and forth in the current. Attached to rocks, shipwrecks or other hard surfaces by their long stems, the hydroids are armed with stinging cells like their close relatives, t...

June 27, 2017

Driving down the road in central Virginia I spotted a fellow selling clams and crabs out of the back of his pickup. I bought a bag of little necks then lifted the lid on the cooler marked crabs.
Much to my surprise they were bright red. I immediately assumed they were steamed crabs. In fact, I asked the fellow if he had any live crabs, then I noticed they were moving. What I was looking at were live red crabs caught off the At...

June 27, 2017

 “All rivers lead to the sea” and Long Island, Connecticut, and New Jersey all have rivers fed by networks of tributaries and streams leading to bays, harbors, and the ocean. Having explored many, I keep finding new opportunities to be surrounded by nature from the vantage point of a power boat, kayak or canoe.
Flora, fauna, and history abound on these rivers. Many had grain and saw mills during our years as a colony and infan...

June 20, 2017

June is an exciting time to fish the ocean for a variety of reasons ranging from fluke to striped bass, bluefish, scup (porgies) and any of the other species that either migrates into and other wise become active in this region.  This year’s weather has been so fickle due to heavy rains, a warm winter, plus other weather and water conditions it’s again difficult to get a read on what will be expected to take place in the angli...

June 13, 2017

They dodged a bullet last year. When Tropical Storm Hermione finally veered out to sea, the crews of 68 mono hull sailboats awoke Labor Day weekend to lively northeast winds on a sun-splashed morning, scattered cotton clouds racing across the skies.
It was the start of the 89th Conanicut Yacht Club Around the Island Race. The oldest continuing yacht race on Narragansett Bay, the competition is easily one of the most popular st...

If you had any thoughts about trying off-season kayaking (after Labor Day until Memorial Day), you still have a little time to get organized. Most kayakers consider summer to be that period between the two holidays. Unlike boaters who have a much longer season, kayakers have to deal closely with water temperatures that are under 70 degrees and have to dress for the possibility of an unexpected swim.
Off-season kayaking is diff...

May 24, 2017

There’s nothing that drives me crazier than listen to people who apparently

haven’t a clue use their boat’s VHF for everything but what it was meant for— this includes babysitting; I simply love hearing a drooler jamming up Channel 16.
There is protocol to follow when using your VHF and it behooves you to know it … especially should you ever be in an emergency situation. Here’re the high points.

Range and Channel Use
VHF radio...

May 24, 2017

After experiencing one of the warmest winters ever, even though the temperature did bounce up and down, Old Man Winter gave us one last slap in the face. And I’m delighted to report that the winter cover remained in place! This was mostly due to the wind keeping snow off the plastic.
The biggest change this year was that I used a different kind of tape to seal the cover to the hull, the major weakness in the old system.
A whil...

Please reload

Copyright 2016 Long Island Boating World. All Rights Reserved.